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Healthcare News

  • What to know about lateral collateral ligament injuries

    The lateral collateral ligament (LCL) is a thin band of connective tissue that runs along the outside of the knee. It connects the femur to the fibula and stabilizes the knee, bracing it from unusual impact. However, injuries are common, particularly during contact sports.

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  • What is water on the knee?

    Knee effusion, sometimes called water on the knee, occurs when excess fluid accumulates in or around the knee joint. Common causes include arthritis and injury to the ligaments or meniscus, which is cartilage in the knee.

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  • In terms of glenoid defects, does size matter?

    Apparently so. A new study looking at the postoperative recurrence rate after arthroscopic bony Bankart repair found that it was lower in male competitive rugby and American football players with a large glenoid defect, in fact 3x lower, than in those with a small glenoid defect.

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  • What to Know About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome in Pregnancy

    CTS is common in pregnancy and can occur in 31% to 62% of people who are pregnant. Researchers aren’t sure why CTS is so common in pregnancy. They speculate that pregnancy-related hormones might contribute to increased swelling throughout the body.

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  • Elite climbers may develop cartilage abnormalities, osteophytes in finger joints

    Results presented at the Virtual EFORT Congress showed an increase in the occurrence of osteophytes and decrease in cartilage thickness in the distal and proximal interphalangeal joints of elite climbers in a 10-year period.

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  • What Can Bring on Sudden Ankle Pain When You Didn’t Injure It?

    You’re strolling along when suddenly a pain shoots through your ankle for no obvious reason. Or perhaps you wake up one morning and your ankle is aching. Without an obvious injury, you might be wondering where the pain came from.

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  • Is Walking Good for Sciatica?

    Whether you should walk and how much you should walk are questions to discuss with your doctor or physical therapist. The general view now is that movement and activity are a good thing for people with sciatica, as long as you walk correctly and are not increasing pain.

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  • Dissecting how pitching affects the glenohumeral joint

    A new study has tackled the subtle, but no less important topic of baseball pitching stressors on the glenohumeral joint. According to the study authors, “Long-term pitching activity changes the stress distribution across the glenohumeral joint surface; however, the influence of competitive level on stress-distribution patterns remains unclear.”

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  • Surgical predictors of clinical outcome six years following revision ACL reconstruction

    A team of orthopedic physicians reports that opting for a transtibial surgical approach and choosing an inference screw for femoral and tibial fixation will improve the patient's odds of having a significantly better six-year clinical outcome.

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  • How a Patellar Tendon Strap Works

    A patellar tendon strap certainly doesn’t look like much. The proven relief it can bring your achy knee, however, can seem nothing short of magical.

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